How Do I Stop Rebound Nasal Congestion?

Does rebound congestion go away on its own?

Rebound congestion often goes away once you stop using decongestant nasal sprays (Yuta, 2013), but abruptly stopping the medication cold turkey can cause more congestion and swelling.

Some people may benefit from decreasing the use of decongestants gradually..

How do I wean myself off of nasal spray?

The best way to break the cycle is to cut down on the medication in a gradual, methodical way. Some people even taper off one nostril at a time. If you end up being just too congested to breathe, you could ask your physician for a prescription for a nasal steroid spray.

Why do nasal decongestants cause rebound congestion?

Causes of Rebound Congestion This is thought to be related to two possible causes: Use of nasal decongestant causes inadequate blood supply (because of the constriction of blood vessels) which causes swelling to occur in your nasal passages.

Is rebound congestion permanent?

The swelling of the nasal passages caused by rebound congestion may eventually result in permanent turbinate hypertrophy, which may block nasal breathing until surgically removed.

Can you overuse saline nasal spray?

A saline spray can be applied through the nostrils as often as your symptoms require. It can be used daily without potential harm. The effects may be relatively short-lived, requiring multiple uses per day. If it is overused, you may simply notice a runny nose as the excess water drains out.

How Long Does rhinitis Medicamentosa last?

OME is defined as fluid in the middle ear without signs or symptoms of ear infection. Approximately 90% of cases of OME resolve spontaneously within 6 months. There is significant controversy regarding the routine treatment of this condition. Most episodes resolve spontaneously within 1 to 2 months.

What drugs cause rebound congestion?

Rhinitis medicamentosa (RM), also known as rebound rhinitis, is a condition characterized by nasal congestion that is triggered by the overuse of topical vasoconstrictive medications, most notably intranasal decongestants; recreational use of intranasal cocaine may also cause a similar condition.

Does saline nasal spray cause rebound congestion?

Yes. These sprays can cause a so-called “nasal spray addiction” in some people. This often occurs when a person uses the decongestant nasal spray too frequently or for too long. Strictly, this is rebound congestion and not an addiction.

How long does rebound congestion last?

And if you continue to use your nasal spray, this congestion can last for weeks or even months. There isn’t a test to formally diagnose rebound congestion. But if rhinitis medicamentosa is to blame, your symptoms should improve after you stop using the medication.

Should you throw away nasal spray after a cold?

If you’re going to use nasal spray, toss it after two days.

How long does nasal spray withdrawal last?

Recovery typically takes less than one week and withdrawal symptoms can be easily managed. Research suggests that the best way to stop overusing DNSs is to switch to a steroid nasal spray.

What happens if you use too much Oxymetazoline?

Using oxymetazoline (nasal) too often or for longer than you have been told may cause nose stuffiness to happen again or get worse. This medicine may cause harm if swallowed or if too much is used. The chance is higher in children.

What happens if you use too much nasal decongestant?

The longer you use a spray decongestant, the more likely you are to get the rebound phenomenon. It can lead to chronic sinusitis and other serious, long-term problems. Give your doctor a call if you’re having any of these issues: It’s all in your nose.

Why is my nose always blocked?

Nasal congestion can be caused by anything that irritates or inflames the nasal tissues. Infections — such as colds, flu or sinusitis — and allergies are frequent causes of nasal congestion and runny nose. Sometimes a congested and runny nose can be caused by irritants such as tobacco smoke and car exhaust.