Quick Answer: What Does Oral Maxillofacial Mean?

Why is it called maxillofacial?

Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery They are called “oral and maxillofacial surgeons” because their works involves not just the mouth (oral), but the face and jaws as well (maxillofacial).

The most common oral surgery is the removal of teeth, either impacted wisdom teeth or other teeth..

What is the difference between oral surgery and maxillofacial?

Maxillofacial surgery is a more advanced form of oral surgery. A maxillofacial surgeon can do everything an oral surgeon can do, and much more besides. An oral and maxillofacial surgeon holds a medical degree and has extensive training in dental medicine.

What does a maxillofacial dentist do?

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are dental specialists who treat conditions, defects, injuries and esthetic aspects of the mouth, teeth, jaws and face. … Oral and maxillofacial surgeons care for patients who experience such conditions as problem wisdom teeth, facial pain and misaligned jaws.

Should I see a dentist or oral surgeon?

Always visit your dentist first for an evaluation, but be prepared to get a referral to an oral surgeon if a wisdom tooth is impacted. One other difference is that wisdom teeth are tough, and they often resist easy pulling.

Why would a dentist refer you to an oral surgeon?

A dentist will normally refer patients to an oral surgeon for issues such as treatment of wisdom teeth, complex extractions, correction of congenital growth defects or if you have a complicated medical history. An oral surgeon is trained and skilled in the following procedures and many others.

What is a maxillofacial injury?

Maxillofacial trauma is any injury to the face or jaws. Facial trauma may present with skin lacerations, burns, obstruction to the nasal cavity or sinuses, damage to the orbital (eye) sockets, fracture to the jawbone, and missing or broken teeth.

Does insurance pay for jaw surgery?

Orthognathic (jaw straightening) surgery is not a dental insurance matter, but may be a covered benefit on the medical insurance. Although there are some medical plans that specifically exclude orthognathic surgery, most insurance plans permit the authorization of orthognathic surgery “when medically necessary”.

What is the meaning of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

“Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery is the specialty of dentistry which includes the diagnosis, surgical and adjunctive treatment of diseases, injuries and defects involving both the functional and aesthetic aspects of the hard and soft tissues of the oral and maxillofacial region.”

What procedures do maxillofacial surgeons do?

impacted teeth, dental implants), jaw and congenital facial disproportion, facial trauma, oral cancer, salivary gland disease, temporomandibular joint disorders, and various benign pathologies (eg. cysts and tumours of the jaws).

Can I go straight to an oral surgeon?

An oral surgeon is needed when your dental emergency requires the tooth to be extracted, or a restructuring of your bone and gum tissue. Oral surgeons have an extensive training in a particular field, and as a patient, you are typically referred to an oral surgeon by your dentist.

What does Maxillofacial Surgery cover?

Procedures undertaken by oral and maxillofacial surgeons include: surgical treatment of facial injuries – complex craniofacial fractures, fractures of the lower jaw, upper jaw, cheekbone, nose, and orbit (sometimes all of these together) and soft tissue injuries of the mouth, face and neck.

When should you see a maxillofacial surgeon?

Examples of maxillofacial surgery Temporomandibular joint surgery. Diagnosis and treatment of head and mouth cancer. Reconstructive surgery for facial trauma. Pre-Implant Bone grafting surgery.