Quick Answer: What Part Of Your Head Hurts When You Have Meningitis?

Can you have meningitis and not know it?

The infection may clear up on its own.

Meningitis can be mistaken for the flu, dehydration, or gastroenteritis.

It can also be overlooked because symptoms may be mild or not always apparent..

What should you do if you suspect meningitis?

Call 999 for an ambulance or go to your nearest A&E immediately if you think you or your child might be seriously ill. Call NHS 111 or your GP surgery for advice if you’re not sure if it’s anything serious or you think you may have been exposed to someone with meningitis.

Can the flu turn into meningitis?

Viruses that can cause meningitis include varicella zoster, the virus that causes chickenpox and shingles; influenza viruses, mumps virus, HIV, arboviruses, which cause diseases such as West Nile and eastern equine encephalitis; and herpes simplex virus. Fungi and parasites also can cause meningitis.

When should you suspect meningitis?

Possible signs and symptoms in anyone older than the age of 2 include: Sudden high fever. Stiff neck. Severe headache that seems different from normal.

What part of neck hurts with meningitis?

A headache caused by meningitis is typically described as severe and unrelenting. It does not subside by taking an aspirin. Stiff neck. This symptom most commonly involves a reduced ability to flex the neck forward, also called nuchal rigidity.

Is it normal to have headaches after meningitis?

Others, however, may appear after a person’s meningitis infection is gone. One of the most common symptoms of meningitis is a severe headache. The inflammation that occurs near the brain and spinal cord can result in significant pain. This headache may be mistaken for a migraine.

Does Meningitis go away by itself?

In most cases, there is no specific treatment for viral meningitis. Most people who get mild viral meningitis usually recover completely in 7 to 10 days without treatment. Antiviral medicine may help people with meningitis caused by viruses such as herpesvirus and influenza.

Can meningitis come on slowly?

Its causes, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are similar to those of chronic meningitis. Bacterial meningitis may be subacute rather than acute. Chronic meningitis develops slowly, over weeks or longer, and may last for months to years. Rarely, chronic meningitis causes only mild symptoms and resolves on its own.

Does meningitis headache come and go?

You may have headaches that come and go for up to 2 weeks. In rare cases, what looks like viral meningitis may turn out to be early bacterial meningitis. That’s why it’s important to be rechecked. Call your healthcare provider if your symptoms get worse or new symptoms appear.

How long can you have meningitis and not know it?

Symptoms of bacterial meningitis can appear quickly or over several days. Typically they develop within 3 to 7 days after exposure. Later symptoms of bacterial meningitis can be very serious (e.g., seizures, coma). For this reason, anyone who thinks they may have meningitis should see a doctor as soon as possible.

How do you rule out meningitis?

For a definitive diagnosis of meningitis, you’ll need a spinal tap to collect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In people with meningitis, the CSF often shows a low sugar (glucose) level along with an increased white blood cell count and increased protein.

Can viral meningitis damage brain?

Although viral meningitis isn’t usually serious, bacterial meningitis can lead to significant brain damage. Swelling of the meninges can result in paralysis or a debilitating stroke. In some cases, bacterial meningitis is fatal.

Does meningitis cause head pressure?

This causes inflammation of the meninges and the brain, which increases intracranial pressure (ICP), i.e. pressure inside the skull. This increase in pressure causes many of the distinctive symptoms of meningitis, 7 including a stiff neck, headache and sensitivity to light.

What part of your head hurts when you have a headache?

A headache may feel like a pain inside your brain, but it’s not. Most headaches begin in the many nerves of the muscles and blood vessels that surround your head, neck, and face. These pain-sensing nerves can be set off by stress, muscle tension, enlarged blood vessels, and other triggers.